pesn.com

Cold Fusion Fever Spreads Again -- Through the Internet

Some researchers are not so happy about the exposure, as they wish to protect their intellectual property for future market applications.

Adapted from a Press Release by Steven Krivit, http://www.newenergytimes.com

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, USA -- In a stunning reversal from the lack of media attention throughout the last 15 years, the cold fusion community is starting to get widespread attention through the use of the Internet and other forms of electronic communication.

However, some researchers within the community are actually displeased about this.

Two websites, http://www.newenergytimes.com and http://www.iscmns.org recently posted information from the most recent international cold fusion conference (ICCF-11), which, to the chagrin of some, contained information which the presenters at the conference did not intend to release publicly. The independent Web sites are maintained by two former information technology specialists, Steven Krivit and William Collis, respectively.

Despite the fact that conference presentations were open to the public and press, the disclosure of certain presentations has now come as a surprise and shock to some. "I am astonished!" said one researcher. "This material belongs to me and my fellow authors," apparently oblivious to the fact that a handful of reporters and one television crew were in the audience.

The topic of scientific secrecy has reared its ugly head within the cold fusion community and the formerly neglected group of researchers are now grappling with the complex issues of confidentiality and copyrights. The disclosure of one of the presentations caused one of the U.S.' leading cold fusion researchers some consternation, saying that this might result in his not lecturing in this manner again.

Despite the concerns of a few, there are others within the community who defend the public's right to know and the free exchange of scientific information. As cold fusion research gains acceptance into mainstream science, it is starting to lose the quiet, private world that so many within the community have, to some extent, enjoyed in the last decade and a half.